What we do in the shadows: Cultivating faculty teaching and learning relationships in online tutorials

Authors

Keywords:

professional development, online team-teaching, transformative teacher identity, critical incident, appreciative inquiry

Abstract

Many academic faculties found themselves unexpectedly thrown into the online teaching context during the COVID-19 pandemic. In our context, online tutorial attendances ranged from 20 to 150 students per session, necessitating the creation of a virtual teaching team. This article offers a perspective on developing collaborative team-teaching from the lived experiences of three academics who suddenly found themselves team-teaching online. We reflected on our experiences of collaborative online teaching over the year and shared our stories with each other. Our analysis drew from elements of Appreciative Inquiry and collaborative autoethnography. Based on the five principles of Appreciative Inquiry, we constructed positive and supportive conceptions of our experiences and opened positive possibilities for course delivery and our ongoing relationships. Important outcomes from this study included the development of our online teaching skills and strategies necessary for effective collaboration in online team-teaching. Our findings will be of interest to educational staff transitioning to online team-teaching.

Author Biographies

Kay Hammond, Auckland University of Technology

Kay Hammond is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Public Health and Interprofessional Studies, at Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. Her teaching interests include academic literacy and methods of research and enquiry. Her research interests focus on the scholarship of teaching and learning in which student and staff wellbeing are paramount. She is an experienced learner within traditional, blended and online learning in Australia, Japan, and New Zealand. She has research interests in exploring collaborative autoethnographic methods for professional development.

Gwen Erlam, Auckland University of Technology

Gwen Erlam is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Public Health and Interprofessional Studies, at Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. She combines her backgrounds in nursing, healthcare education, simulation and an interest in wellness in her teaching and research. She obtained tertiary qualifications in nursing, distance and online education, and simulation with undergraduate healthcare students.  She is an experienced teacher within traditional, blended and flipped classrooms in the USA and New Zealand. These experiences give her multidimensional empathy with students of different generations, online/offline spaces, and wellbeing practices in higher education.

Carmel Cedro, Auckland University of Technology

Experienced Lecturer with a demonstrated history of working in the higher education industry. Skilled in Communication, Research, Establishing Relationships, and Writing. Strong education professional (Doctor of Philosophy), focused in Communication and Media Studies from Auckland University of Technology.

Published

2021-12-02

How to Cite

Hammond, K., Erlam, G., & Cedro, C. (2021). What we do in the shadows: Cultivating faculty teaching and learning relationships in online tutorials. Advancing Scholarship and Research in Higher Education, 2(1). Retrieved from https://asrhe.org/index.php/asrhe/article/view/5711

Issue

Section

Research Complete Articles